• Call us: +27(0)31 573 2995
  • Email us: admin@durbanviationcentre.com
  • Open 7 days a week

Faq-school

a

Can I get a ‘loan’ from the school and pay it back once I have gotten a job ?

No, we do not offer this kind of financing. Our services and flight training are on a cash up-front basis.

Do you offer any types of grants or scholarships?

Due to the high number of grant and scholarship requests we are unfortunately not able to offer this kind of support for any of our students.

Should I prepare for the course before enrolling?

The course is structured to prepare students well before their first flight. However the better prepared you are the greater will be your progress, this will continue to be the case all the way through the training process.
If you want to prepare before the course consider buying the Pilots Handbook books one and four and read up on chapters
It is also advised to complete the written test on your training aircraft as soon as possible.

What equipment will I need?

There is an extensive checklist in the front of your training file with regard to books and other equipment. Besides the items on this list you should consider buying a headset. Durban Aviation Centre does have a limited number of headsets but these are quickly used up at busy times.

What should I wear when flying?

Those pilots who are training toward their CPL are required to wear a uniform comprising of a white pilots shirt, navy pants (avoid using fabric that may be flammable) and black leather shoes. On passing the PPL flight test epaulettes with one gold bar should be worn. Those pilots holding a night rating should wear epaulettes with two bars and three bars for CPL pilots.
All other pilots may wear what suits them, shorts are fine to wear particularly in the summer months. Wear sensible shoes, avoid shoes with heavy or thick soles, a thin rubber sole is best. Do not wear slops.
Durban Aviation Centre epaulettes and wings should be removed when leaving the airfield, and never worn in the Wings Club or any other bar on or off the field.

What is airmanship?

In a nutshell airmanship is all about having the right attitude toward piloting. It has been said that airmanship is not just knowing what the right thing to do is but then actually doing it.
Here are some examples of good airmanship:

➢ Ensure that the Master switches are off after flight
➢ Ensure that the key is out of the magneto switch when closing down.
➢ Aircraft must be left clean after flight
➢ Aircraft must be chocked after flight
➢ Control locks must be in after flight.
➢ Pitot covers must be put on.
➢ Widescreens should be cleaned before flight, and windshield covers should be put in place after flight.
➢ Complete all documentation before and after flight as per the club rules.
➢ Aircraft are to be parked at the correct hangar after flight
➢ Fill in the authorisation sheet as required
➢ Report aircraft snags to Durban Aviation Centre Staff
➢ Do not leave chocks lying around parking areas
➢ When walking about the airfield walk behind fixed wing aircraft, and in front of helicopters.
➢ All aircraft are to be refuelled after flight if the tanks are less than half full
➢ Please attend our regular safety meetings, see the notice board for details

At all times conduct yourself in a professional manner, and be considerate of other aviators.

What Factors may delay my flight training?

We have already mentioned the weather but there are other reasons for possible delays. Aircraft will break down; due to the nature of flying even the most seemingly inconsequential of problems will result in an aircraft being grounded. This can prove frustrating but at Durban Aviation Centre we expect the highest attention to flight safety from all our pilots. If an aircraft has a problem it is ‘Snagged’ and grounded until the fault has been attended to and the aircraft has been signed out as airworthy by an engineer. If you are at all unsure about any kind of defect simply cancel the flight.

All of our training aircraft receive an extensive check and service every 100 hours; this is known as an MPI. The MPI may take as little as two days to complete but depending on the work required may take longer. We do our best to rotate aircraft and plan for MPI’s but this does not always work out.

What should I wear when flying?

Those pilots who are training toward their CPL are required to wear a uniform comprising of a white pilots shirt, navy pants (avoid using fabric that may be flammable) and black leather shoes. On passing the PPL flight test epaulettes with one gold bar should be worn. Those pilots holding a night rating should wear epaulettes with two bars and three bars for CPL pilots.
All other pilots may wear what suits them, shorts are fine to wear particularly in the summer months. Wear sensible shoes, avoid shoes with heavy or thick soles, a thin rubber sole is best. Do not wear slops.
Durban Aviation Centre epaulettes and wings should be removed when leaving the airfield, and never worn in the Wings Club or any other bar on or off the field.

With regard to the weather, when is the best time to fly?

Without a doubt the winter months of June, July and August offer the clearest weather. September and October are the windy months of the years, so much so that many flights will be cancelled. October through to December is the wettest period of the year and January and February although drier offer regular afternoon thunderstorms. Despite the rain, wind and storms the Durban climate offers some of the most consistent flying weather in the world and very few days are lost altogether through the year.

How difficult are the examinations?

See the Examination and Study guide for more information. Do not neglect your preparation for the various examinations in the course. As a rule of thumb if you are planning to take six months to complete the course you should be studying one hour a day. A full time student looking at a two to three month timeframe should be studying two to three hours a day six days a week. Are the exams hard, yes, but if you put the work in you will pass.

How long will it take to complete my PPL Training ?

First of all the syllabus is flexible and designed to suit the individual student’s schedule. The minimum number of hours required to hold a PPL is 45; most students however complete the course closer to 50 hours. It is true that the more often you fly the faster will be your progress. A maximum of two flights per day and a suggested minimum of two flights per week will ensure that you are current and keep up with the course. At Durban Aviation Centre we understand the value of thorough pre-flight preparation. All students receive extensive briefing before each flight designed to optimise the flight lesson. Despite the pre flight briefing it is still essential; that you read up and prepare yourself for each lesson. Your attitude toward the flight training is the most important ingredient of all.

So to answer the question it may be possible to complete the course in as little as three months for a full time, dedicated student. For a part time student flying twice a week six months is a more realistic time frame. Remember that for every hour you spend in the air you will need to spend two to three hours on the ground studying and preparing for flights.
Your progress will also depend on other factors such as your natural ability, the quality of your preparation and your understanding of the theory.

main_menu_windsock1